Infusions of Healing: A Treasury of Mexican-American Herbal Remedies

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NATURAL REMEDIOS For diseases EVERYDAY When the Spaniards conquered Aztecs, they stumbled upon a treasure ultimately more useful and more durable than the mounds of glittering gold of Moctezuma – herbs and medicines developed by the Indians, who in many ways surpassed the rudimentary medicine of the Old World. The remains of these remedies, potions, teas, and tonics at the base of countless natural remedies still used in many Mexican American homes today. However, these herbs and remedies are collected in a volume that is as practical as it is fascinating. In Infusions Healing , you will find: * The

intriguing story of how this long-suppressed ancient knowledge was passed over five centuries. Hundreds
* Security, effective treatments herbal for everyday ailments – teas, liniments, compresses, ointments, baths and soothing for headaches, colds, fever, digestive disorders, menstrual cramps, skin problems, pain, and much more.
* An alphabetical listing of over 200 herbs and plants, (birch) for (sasparilla), including their English , Spanish, Nahuatl (Aztec), and botanical names, with detailed notes on their history and healing properties. * The panel of traditinatural remedies modern practitioners of herbal medicine in Mexican-American, most of their remedies recorded in print for the first time.

Thorough, well organized and rich in history, Infusions of Healing a practical guide for anyone interested in natural remedies, and an invaluable contribution to the preservation of a tradition deeply rooted in Latino culture. Amazon . com review The Aztecs were
expert gardeners who cultivated and studied medicinal plants. Flower gardens and were used by Aztec physicians as laboratories, and each family has a basic knowledge of herbal medicine. This rich tradition in herbal healing has been passed and amended by subsequent generations, and is much alive in American culture of Mexico today. In Infusions Healing , author Joy Davidow traces the history of this tradition. Then she presents a collection of 200 herbs. For each, it gives the common name, botanical name, other names, descriptions, historical, scientific validation (if any), parts used, the property, it is used to treat and warnings . Another section discusses medicinal plants organized by the type of treatment: pain, digestive, urinary, respiratory and pain, and so on. For example, you learn what herbs to use as a “mouthwash” for inflammation of the gums, how to make liniments for arthritic joints, which teas to treat diarrhea, and herbs that can be used locally to soothe irritated , including hemorrhoids. Davidow also profiles Mexican Modern American healers, with descriptions of their treatmeherbal remediesascinating book, if you’re interested in herbal medicine.

Infusions of Healing: A Treasury of Mexican-American Herbal Remedies

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5 Responses to “Infusions of Healing: A Treasury of Mexican-American Herbal Remedies”

  1. Joie Davidow to tell the story of the Aztecs is fascinating. When she draws her conclusion that the Aztecs had survived, their medicinal plants could compete with the Chinese, I was totally convinced. Find this book while looking for books on tea was a fluke. And while Mexicans may have a lot of herbs in their medicine chest as the Chinese, this book focuses on about 200 or so of the most widespread and used. I always thought that we should use herbs that grow around us instead of trying to increase those of another region. So I was happy to find a book on herbs from the south-west. What I did not expect was how many plants were not included in the region of Mexico or the southwest. It shows that his research is up to date on what herbs are used by Mexicans for medicinal purposes today. Particularly useful is the complete list of names given for each plant. Common names vary from region to region so that it can be difficult to locate the correct herb tea recipe for healing. Not only are we given several Mexican names for plants but also the Nahuatl or Aztec name. Almost all conceivable evils are listed and that single or combined herbs should be used. Easy to use and convenient to have this book is as exciting as reading.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  2. For many years popular North American-based plants have been Eurocentric. It is rewarding, useful and timely as “Infusions of Healing: A Treasury of Mexican American Herbal Medicine” was presented to the public. As an herbalist I welcome the opportunity to broaden my understanding of the use of traditional names botanical history of plants by Mexican Americans, Mexicans and Native Americans, among others. Davidow book is comprehensive, thoughtful and engaging. The style of the illustrations are the perfect companion to the text. I put “Infusion Healing “at the top of the list of vital medicinal plants for its modern qualities contribution to intercultural knowledge of herbal practices.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  3. I bought this book unseen and I’m so glad you did. This book is a treasure trove of herbal and folk healing practices. There are many herbs listed in traditional uses, large tables of correspondence and my favorite part is a small section on some of the popular saints in curanderismo. I am very happy to have this book and I will treasure for many years.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  4. As I’m studying to become an herbalist, a book is very educational. I like the idea that the author gives you the name of the plant in Spanish, English, Nahuatl and Maya. I highly recommend this book to people with an open mind and love to heal naturally.
    Rating: 5 / 5

  5. I studied under a curandero, which adds a bit more to my education. There are plenty of books out there herbal worldwide, and there is time CURANDERISMO gets recognition. . . Thank you Joy!
    Rating: 5 / 5

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